Friday, July 31, 2020

No club meetings planned for August

Because of ongoing limits on public gatherings due to the pandemic, no Loveland Fishing Club events are planned through at least the month of August, according to President Jim Baxter. This unfortunately includes the annual picnic.

Some club members are continuing to gather on Friday mornings for breakfast. 

Thursday, July 30, 2020

Active military and veterans get in free to Colorado state parks in August


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Bridget Kochel
Statewide Public Information Officer
720-219-2919 / bridget.kochel@state.co.us

Active military and veterans get in free to Colorado state parks in August


Colorado flag and american flag in the wind with blue skies in the background
The free August Military Passes become available on August 1, 2020. 


DENVER – As a thank you to U.S. military members, Colorado Parks and Wildlife offers active duty military, veterans and the National Guard free admission to all state parks for the month of August.

Military members and veterans, resident and nonresident, can pick up a free August Military Pass at any Colorado state park or CPW office by showing proof of service. Passes become available on August 1, 2020.

“We want to honor the brave men and women who currently serve or have served our country by hosting them at our state parks,” said Colorado Parks and Wildlife Director Dan Prenzlow. “This is an opportunity for our military and veterans to spend some quality time in nature and connect with the beautiful landscapes and natural wonders they protect.”

The free park pass provides a chance to experience Colorado’s state parks and the diverse wildlife and terrain they showcase. All other park fees remain in effect, including camping reservations, boat and off-highway vehicle registrations, and hunting and fishing licenses.

To begin planning a unique Colorado adventure, visit the CPW park finder. State park outdoor recreation activities include: 
  • Water sports- boating, kayaking, paddle boarding and swimming
  • Wildlife and wildflower viewing, birdwatching and tours with naturalists
  • Hiking, horseback riding, biking and rock climbing
  • Stargazing and geocaching
  • Accessibility programs are available to people with disabilities

CPW also offers military benefits for outdoor activities to active duty military, veterans, and disabled veterans. Programs include free admission to state parks on Veterans Day, year-round free entry to all state parks to residents with Colorado Disabled Veterans license plates and free small game and fishing combination licenses for qualified disabled veterans. CPW also offers a Columbine Pass which offers reduced park entrance fees to disabled Colorado residents.

“Our agency appreciates the sacrifices our military members make to secure our freedoms to enjoy an outdoor heritage,” said U.S Marine Corps Veteran and Southwest Region Manager Cory Chick. “This is a small token of our appreciation to thank our military and veterans for helping us protect our state lands for Coloradans to enjoy and cherish.” 

For more information about Colorado’s state parks, visit the CPW website. Learn more about Care for Colorado - Leave No Trace principles on how to recreate responsibly. 


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


   


Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in at our website to receive communication from Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Our mailing address is:
Colorado Parks and Wildlife
1313 N Sherman St
Denver, CO 80203-2236


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Sport Fish Restoration Act: Anglers Investing in Improved Fishing

By Andy Schafermeyer 
On any given day, I might find myself with a break in the busy schedule of life, work, and family. I don’t struggle with ways to occupy my free time and almost always resort to my lifelong passion of fishing. I might find myself waist-deep in a river fly-fishing for trout. I might be standing on the ice in winter or on a muddy shoreline in spring, but I’m always looking for opportunities to catch fish. My most common approach is to launch my boat and spend time on whatever waterbody offers the best fishing conditions.
In my world, boat styles, fishing gear, and rods, reels, and tackle are often over-analyzed. In contrast, many anglers who use boating and fishing access sites give little to no thought to their interworking’s, myself included.  Although I have used these state fish and wildlife agency access areas a thousand times, I never thought about the logistics that go into providing anglers and boaters with these opportunities. 
I simply launch my boat, park my truck and trailer in a designated area, take advantage of other facilities such as picnic tables, garbage cans, and restrooms, and go fishing.  For sporting types who pay such attention to detail, this seems strange to me and I decided recently to gain a better understanding. What I discovered was a well-functioning partnership that utilizes specialized funding sources to provide opportunities to anglers and boaters throughout the country.  In short, I discovered a success story. 
Everyone benefits from public boat access coupled with sound fisheries management, provided by state fish and wildlife agencies and supported by a manufacturers’ excise tax on fishing equipment and motorboat fuel.  Photo by Jason Carrier.
At first glance, I realized I owe a huge thank-you to my state fish and wildlife agency for providing this access, but a complete explanation didn’t end there.  In reality, fishing tackle manufacturers, companies that make boats and boat components, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are to thank as well.  Through the Sport Fish Restoration Act of 1950 (aka the Dingell-Johnson Act), a manufacturers’ excise tax on fishing equipment and a portion of the gasoline tax attributable to motorboats are collected each year and passed on to state fish and wildlife agencies by the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program.  
Without realizing it, I’ve helped to fund this fantastic conservation partnership through the manufacturer’s excise taxes.  What’s more, my fishing license fees are used by the state agencies as their required match to receive the Sport Fish Restoration funds. This is a classic example of a user-pay program that benefits the larger population by enhancing access and opportunities. This was an enlightening observation and I investigated further.
Easy to see are the land acquisition, easements, and protection of these access sites. Also clear is the maintenance required to keep them operational.  Over 6,400 boat access sites are operated and maintained across the United States each year using the Sport Fish Restoration funds and they have also helped construct over 1,100 new fishing and boating access sites in the past five years.  With this crucial first step in-place, what happens when the boat is launched and I start to cast? The partnership and program is far from over and the benefits keep rolling in. 
Few people realize fishing license revenue and Sport Fish Restoration funds are used to construct, operate, and maintain thousands of public boating and fishing access areas across the United States.   Photo courtesy of WSFR.
For those fisheries that are maintained with stocked fish, the excise taxes provide funds to raise the fry. Across the nation, these funds help operate and maintain over 300 state fish hatcheries, which produce over 1.3 billion fish of 70 species each year. This makes for some very productive fishing and many happy anglers, as well as the successful restoration of some fish species.
Many waterbodies do not require the supplemental stocking of fish, as opportunities exist for naturally occurring species. However, these waterbodies still require research, surveys and management to provide healthy fish populations, and the excise taxes also help fund these state agency activities. 
For many years, I appreciated my fishing experiences but rarely asked myself the question of their origin and propagation. I had no idea that such a unique conservation partnership existed. State fish and wildlife agencies, manufacturers, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program work together to connect people with the natural world. By creating and maintaining access areas, the public has an opportunity to visit and use some truly beautiful locations. By maintaining healthy fisheries, recreational angling will thrive and expand. 
People all over the country are provided these opportunities, yet few know how and why. Thanks to the continuation of funding my children and their children are likely to have the same opportunities thanks to this unique partnership. 

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Wyoming: Try the Cutt Slam Challenge

Wyoming: Try the Cutt Slam Challenge

Cheyenne - Some Wyoming anglers are a cutt above the rest. What sets these special 1,743 men and women apart from the crowd? They completed the Wyoming Cutt Slam, one of the most sought-after achievements for any trout angler.

The Cutt-Slam challenges anglers to catch Wyoming’s four subspecies of cutthroats — Bonneville, Colorado River, Snake River and Yellowstone — in their respective native range.

“For trout enthusiasts, the Cutt Slam is a fishing adventure,” said Alan Osterland, Wyoming Game and Fish Department chief of fisheries. “It will most certainly take anglers to remote places in Wyoming where they’ve never been before, through spectacular country and of course, to wonderful fishing waters.”

Beyond the bragging rights and memories, those who complete the challenge will receive a personalized certificate featuring the four subspecies, a Wyoming Cutt-Slam commemorative medallion provided by Wyoming Trout Unlimited and a Cutt-Slam vehicle decal. For consideration, anglers must submit to Game and Fish a photo of each species labeled with the date and location caught. Submissions can be sent with a mail-in application or online.

An interactive mapping tool on the Game and Fish website helps anglers plan their trip through Western Wyoming. It provides the location of waters native to each species and gives recommendations on where to fish.

The Wyoming Cutt-Slam was founded 23 years ago by Ron Remmick, a Game and Fish fisheries biologist, to encourage anglers to learn about Wyoming’s cutthroat trout, their habitat needs and the ways Game and Fish manages these native fish. To see photos of past recipients and for more information, visit the Cutt-Slam website.

Monday, July 27, 2020

Celebrate Colorado Day with Free Entrance into State Parks on August 3


This free entry day provides an opportunity to experience Colorado’s state parks and the diverse landscapes they showcase.

DENVER – In celebration of Colorado Day, and the 144th birthday of the state, Colorado Parks and Wildlife offers free entry to 41 state parks on Monday, August 3. Although the state recognizes this annual holiday on the first of the month, state parks celebrate the occasion with free entrance on the first Monday of August.

Colorado Day was created by the state legislature to mark the anniversary of statehood, granted in 1876 by President Ulysses S. Grant.

“Colorado Day is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the natural beauty of our state and spend time outside,” said State Trails Program Manager Fletcher Jacobs. “Coloradans have a rich tradition of embracing an outdoor lifestyle, and our state parks offer a variety of outdoor activities that people of all ages and physical levels can enjoy.”

This free entry day provides an opportunity to experience Colorado’s state parks and the diverse landscapes they showcase. All other park fees remain in effect, including camping reservations, boat and off-highway vehicle registrations, and hunting and fishing licenses.

To begin planning your unique Colorado adventure, visit the CPW park finder. State park outdoor recreation activities include: 
  • Water sports- boating, kayaking, paddle boarding, and swimming
  • Wildlife and wildflower viewing, birdwatching and tours with naturalists
  • Hiking, horseback riding, biking, and rock climbing
  • Stargazing and geocaching
  • Accessibility programs are available to people with disabilities
In an effort to thank military members for their service, CPW offers active duty and veterans free admission to all state parks for the entire month of August. Military members and veterans can pick up a free August Military Pass at any Colorado state park or CPW office by showing proof of military service. Passes become available on August 1, 2020.

Coloradans are encouraged to practice the Care for Colorado - Leave No Trace principles and trail safety etiquette when recreating outdoors, such as:
  • Plan ahead- visit individual park pages or use the Colorado Trail Explorer (COTREX) app to learn about park closures and visitor center hours
  • Spread out on trails to avoid crowds
  • Wear a face mask that covers your nose and mouth when passing people on trails
  • Avoid dangerous outdoor activities that can result in a hospital visit
  • Pack out your trash
For more information about Colorado’s state parks and outdoor recreation, visit the CPW website. Learn more about Colorado's Outdoor Principles and how outdoor recreation should be enjoyed with thoughtful conservation.
 

Colorado blue columbine
bighorn sheep

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


   


Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in at our website to receive communication from Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Our mailing address is:
Colorado Parks and Wildlife
1313 N Sherman St
Denver, CO 80203-2236


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list